A jet?

Last week I was cruising through the news and came across an article about a few US televangelists and their corporate jets.  I won’t say much about this other than their time will come.  This though made me wonder about Christ’s response if he were walking this earth today?  I don’t profess to know his thoughts however I can’t imagine he’d be smiling and toasting their behavior or decisions, probably more in line with when he cleared the temple of those who were buying and selling.  Yet, Jesus isn’t here today, so we don’t have a physical person right before our eyes to look at and to follow his lead, but we do have common sense and quite a few chapters that provide some great insight into how we should live and places we should invest our money in.

In this same line of thought, the squandering of resources for unjust gain all in the name of God, I wish there was a way I could further support or call attention to those individuals and organizations who are doing things right, from pure motives, demonstrating stewardship of what has been gifted them, putting the needs of others before their own, in fact, they are living out the very commands of scripture which speak of love, justice, mercy, humility and service, all as a means of demonstrating that they are a light shining brightly on a dark hill, being change agents in an unjust world.

The organizations that we work with fall into the category of those who are about others instead of themselves, it’s why we partner with them in the first place.  From time to time I’m asked how do I find my partners and my answer usually catches people by surprise because the answer is “I didn’t find them, God brought me to them or them to me.”  This is the honest truth, I have never searched out partners, through circumstances or events, I’ve come alongside people and as I’ve surveyed the need, I’ve seen the people at work and heard the Spirit speak and say “go” and so, I’ve gone.  Baby steps at first, to test the water per se, and with time projects happen, success is evident, and more work ensues.  Having things happen this way brings a certain freedom and peace as I know that the foundation is strong because it was authored by God.  Sure, we have our parts to play, we must be mindful of all that happens, but a certain level of peace and confidence permeates the partnership because we know it isn’t man made, it’s like faith, when you have it, all sorts of things can happen. 

At the heart of Wells for Life is the underlying truth that we’re on this earth for a purpose, ours is to be obedient to a call; a call to provide clean, safe water to rural areas in need in order to make a difference that will last a lifetime.  We carry this out through our indigenous partnerships who share our mindset and who were already at work doing what they were called to do before we showed up.  Our resources just enhance their existing work, so in a sense you can say, we are strengthening their hands to do and be the change agents there were called to be.  Happily, this is all done with an understanding towards the future, eternity in fact, knowing that an accounting will be given with all that has been entrusted, resultantly no corporate jets for us.  However, a helicopter to take me to the really remote areas would be ideal so that I don’t have to get beat up by the roads and inadequate suspension on my aging spine. Now I’m beginning to sound like those televangelists. 😊 

Bottom line, when you support Wells for Life you are providing a touch which constantly gives a return.  Our prayer is that the well will never run dry; figuratively and literally.  Your support keeps the water flowing and for that, I’m grateful but nothing compared with the gratitude felt by those in India who now have easy access to a clean water source.

Cyclone Fani

Cyclone Fani hit the NE Indian state of Odisha with quite the punch last week. Reportedly winds were blowing at 120 mph and gusting to 150 mph which meant any weak infrastructure would meet its demise. Thankfully the state government of Odisha was quick to respond and amazingly evacuated over 1 million people within a short period of time, which saved 10’s of thousands of lives.

One of our project partners, STEP, has its base of operations in Odisha and despite being some 45 miles inland from the coast, experienced damaging winds and rains, thankfully though none of their structures were harmed. As the Cyclone blew past Odisha and moved towards Bangladesh, the staff at STEP began to mobilize and strategize on how they could provide disaster relief and first aid in the surrounding rural villages. They have since sent teams to survey the damage in the surrounding areas and have developed a plan to provide needed Relief for those negatively impacted. The relief will be simple and basic, but so necessary; food, water and clothing. With some time and resources, they hope to help with providing shelter or engage in reconstruction projects for those who lost roofs or walls to their simple homes.

If you would like to learn more about the work that STEP is doing to help the victims of Cyclone Fani, please visit their website at STEP International and consider giving a gift to help them bring a helping hand to some very needy people in rural Odisha.

Final 2018 trip is a just a few weeks away

Yes, it’s true I just returned from a trip but that was to participate in a Leadership seminar and to open water projects. Thankfully all went wonderfully and was happy to be home in time for the trick or treaters and raiding my sons stash of candy.

As I mentioned, in a few weeks I’ll be returning to India, this time to open 8 projects in Gujarat and Maharashtra. When those are completed I’ll fly to Vijayawada and visit a couple of other projects which were completed back in August but I haven’t seen yet then I’ll head over to Chennai and travel to some property where a children’s home is to be constructed and where we’ve just brought water so they can get started with the actual construction of buildings.

It’s a full trip for me, a lot packed into the 9 days and I’m already looking ahead into 2019 and my upcoming travel schedule.

Looking ahead into 2019, I’m scheduled to be back in India the 3rd week of January and open projects in West Bengal and Odisha. In February the plan is to travel to Andhra Pradesh and spend time at New Life Children’s Home and open projects within that area as well as do some video work retelling the Wells for Life story. In April I’m doing something I swore I would never do and that’s travel to India as it’s really, really hot then but I’m doing it because some good friends have asked me to join them and it’s a unique opportunity for me to give them a glimpse of the real India, what normal life is like for millions of rural folk living without a constant electricity flow (to power lights, fans and my favorite – AC) or more necessary, clean water. I’ll be praying for abnormally cool temperatures.

In the interim, this is the Holiday Season when people start thinking about gift giving, cooking, travel and time off, as well as Black Friday shopping, so when you’re engaged in all of that and you get thirsty and go for that water bottle, coffee, tea or soda; remember me and Wells for Life.

It’s your gift giving that makes it possible for Wells for Life to carry out its mission of bringing clean, safe water to rural India, so thank you for your support and faithful giving this year and through the years.

Almost 850 places have access to clean water because of you, which is an amazing number and this doesn’t even touch the programs which aren’t water related that we have been involved in, so great job in making a difference and helping me change lives.

All your giving to Wells for Life is tax deductible and if you haven’t considered giving through your company’s matching gift program, look into it as essentially that’s free money out there waiting to be invested in a good cause and I can’t think of a better one than ours. (If Wells for Life isn’t on your company’s give list, contact me for the necessary information to get us added.)

Here’s a clip of a video from a project I opened this summer for some friends.

Blessings to you.

Summer Travels

i returned from India last month having opened 10 water projects in Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh.  During this trip I invited my daughter to join me so she could experience in a small way what I experience when I’m gone so many times throughout the year. The journey at times was arduous but in the end I trust rewarding for both of us, how else can you look at traveling with a teenager who isn’t used to the rigorous schedule of India?  She was a trooper though and despite not being with me for the entire trip, I did let her hang out at a children’s home for almost a week, I know India has a place in her heart.

Next week I pack my bags and head back to India for 11 or 12 days and will be opening projects in Tamil Nadu, Odisha and Karnataka.  I’m packing in a lot for such a short time but 11 places are receiving water and I’ll be scouting out a project for a friend who just purchased some property and is starting a children’s home near Chennai.

Aside from this work, I’m already looking forward to the fall and lining up projects in Gujarat and Maharahjatra and possibly back in Odisha, so a busy time and a time for the windows of heaven to open and funding for all this work to fall down!!

One of the projects in Gujarat I’m excited to visit and fund is for a small school of tribal kids. They look like the cutest kids ever and the water is going to help strengthen their efforts as they do the best they can at providing an education for these little youngsters.

 

Kerala, the southernmost state in India has been in the news recently because of all the rain and flooding.  The pictures coming out of Kerala are tragic and many blame God for the increased rains, unfortunately this is misplaced blame as God doesn’t send destruction on people and if you don’t believe then just read about Jesus and what he says about God’s viewpoint towards people.

Wells for Life doesn’t have any operations or partners at this point in Kerala so we are not involved in any efforts of relief for those caught up in the flooding, nor are any of our indigenous partners.  If you are reading this post and want to be involved financially in Kerala and the relief efforts then message me and I’ll route you to places where your money will be wisely spent.  If you want to read a bit about what has happened and see some photos, here’s an article that I found interesting – https://thewire.in/environment/debunked-eight-malicious-myths-about-the-kerala-floods

As always, our work is based upon gifts from everyday people like yourself so no matter the size of gift, we’ll make good use of it. More projects need funding, more people need clean water!

Niti Aayog report

In mid June the Niti Aayog report was published highlighting the water crisis that is now taking place in India.  The unique thing about this report is that it’s the first of its kind and took 2 years to complete.  It had support from both the public and private sector which was remarkable and resultantly provides one of the clearest pictures of where India is at today in regards to water.

I found the report insightful and despite the fact that it is alarming there was a hint of optimism especially if the report gains political traction on the local, state and national level.

Here are some of the reports highlights which should give you a glimpse into the realities that India now faces with clean water.  After reading these if you want to look at the entire report you can click on this link – http://www.niti.gov.in/writereaddata/files/document_publication/2018-05-18-Water-Index-Report_vS8-compressed.pdf

  • India is undergoing the worst water crisis in its history. Already, more than 600 million people13 are facing acute water shortages. Critical groundwater resources – which account for 40% of our water supply – are being depleted at unsustainable rates.
  • Droughts are becoming more frequent, creating severe problems for India’s rain-dependent farmers (~53% of agriculture in India is rainfed17). When water is available, it is likely to be contaminated (up to 70% of our water supply), resulting in nearly 200,000 deaths each year18. Interstate disagreements are on the rise, with seven major disputes currently raging, pointing to the fact that limited frameworks and institutions are in place for national water governance19.
  • More worryingly, the low performers on the Water Index are home to ~50% of the country’s population, thereby highlighting the significant water risk faced by the country. The low performers are, worryingly, comprised of the populous northern states of UP, Bihar, Rajasthan, Haryana, and others, and are home to over 600 million people36. The poor performance of these states on the Index highlights a significant water management risk for the country going forward. Further, these states also account for 20-30% of India’s agricultural output37. Given the combination of rapidly declining groundwater levels and limited policy action (as indicated by the low Index score), this is also likely to be a significant food security risk for the country going forward.
  • These results highlight the growing national crisis of groundwater—54% of India’s groundwater wells are declining in level due to extraction rates exceeding recharge rates and 21 major cities are expected to run out of groundwater as soon as 2020, affecting ~100 million people42. This crisis is further driven by a poorly defined legal framework for groundwater that rests ownership with landowners and leads to unchecked extraction. This crisis is most acute in the Indian agriculture sector, where groundwater accounts for 63% of all irrigation water43.

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13Source: World Resource Institute

14 Baseline water stress measures total annual water withdrawals (municipal, industrial, and agricultural) expressed as a percent of the total annual available flow for 2010. Higher values indicate more competition among users.

15Source: WRI Aqueduct; https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/6-3-crore-indians-do-not-have-access-to-clean-drinking-water/storydWIEyP962FnM8Mturbc52N.html; https://en.reset.org/blog/water-borne-diseases-india

16Source: Census 2011

17Source: State of Indian Agriculture, 2015-16

18Source: WHO Global Health Observatory

19Source: ClearIAS

36Source: 2011 Census of India

37Source: Planning Commission Databook 2014; India Energy Statistics 2015

42 Source: WRI; World Bank (Hindustan Times, The Hindu)

43Source: FAO AQUASTAT database

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April 2018 trip

3 weeks ago I returned from my 2nd trip to India this year and had the chance to see four recently completed projects with this being one of them.  It amazes me to see the simplicity of life that so many people live in rural India and how powerful access to water becomes; for this Gypsy community the water on the newly acquired land will ultimately bring homes.

I call that change, positive change which came because someone believed in what I was doing and they gave money; money which brought clean water and for this community, a chance at a better life.

Tent living no more!